Holy Cross Cancer Blog

Cancer Risk Assessment and Prevention

  • Posted Feb 03, 2015
  • hchadmin

Cancer risk assessment, screening and prevention programs are vital to educating people about reducing their chances of developing cancer and assessing the need for intervention. The Michael & Dianne Bienes Comprehensive Cancer Center offers a Cancer Risk and Prevention Program under the direction of a genetic nurse counselor and the cancer center physicians.


Although the program is for anyone with cancer or a family history of cancer, the vast majority of the participants are women who have or have had breast or ovarian cancer or who are at high risk for developing one of these cancers.


In light of a growing body of research confirming that many common cancers—including breast, ovarian and colorectal cancer—are hereditary, the Clinical Cancer Genetics Cancer Risk and Prevention Program helps people understand their personal cancer risk profiles, offering a comprehensive cancer risk assessment that takes into account family history and genetics, along with environmental and lifestyle factors.


With this information, people can take proactive steps to prevent or beat cancer. The genetic test for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (HBOC) consists of an analysis of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes by sequencing and large rearrangement. If you meet the criteria for having a mutation, most insurance providers will cover the cost. Knowledge of a mutation in the BRCA genes enables one to be proactive in prevention of cancer, treatment choices and identifying family members who may be at risk (or not) of having a mutation. To learn more, please call 954-267-7704.

Carol Brudenell, MSN, RN, AOCN
Genetic Nurse Counselor

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Head of Cancer Center Named Chair of the American Cancer Society Florida Division

  • Posted Jan 21, 2015
  • hchadmin

Maureen Mann, M.S., M.B.A., F. A.C.H.E. has been named 2015 Florida Division Board Chair for the American Cancer Society. Mann, who recently completed a one-year term as Board Chair-elect, is executive director of the Michael and Dianne Bienes Cancer Center at Holy Cross Hospital in Fort Lauderdale.

Mann’s volunteerism with the American Cancer Society spans more than 13 years and includes membership on the Florida Division Board of Directors since 2006, serving on the Broward County Volunteer Leadership Board and sitting on the national board of directors of the Society’s sister advocacy organization, the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, Inc. 

Holy Cross Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center in Boston recently entered into a five-year affiliation agreement that is the first agreement of its kind outside of New England for Massachusetts General Hospital, the largest teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School. Through this collaboration, the Michael and Dianne Bienes Comprehensive Cancer Center provides physicians with access to national resources to treat all types of cancer, including but not limited to breast, colon, lung, pancreatic and prostate cancers.

In addition to her appointment by the Florida Department of Health to serve on the Florida State Cancer Plan Council, Mann serves on the national editorial board of the Association of Community Cancer Centers and has been a member of the Board of Directors of Gilda's Club of South Florida for 10 years.  Other community service includes membership in the Leadership Miami-Class of 1995 and the Junior League of Ft. Lauderdale.

Mann received a B.A. from Harvard University and M.S. and M.B.A. degrees from Florida Institute of Technology.

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Holy Cross Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center Expand and Extend Collaboration

  • Posted Jan 05, 2015
  • hchadmin

New five-year agreement expands oncology services to South Florida residents
First agreement of its kind for Massachusetts General Hospital outside of New England


FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (January  5, 2015) – Holy Cross Hospital in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. and Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center in Boston have entered into a five-year affiliation agreement that expands their collaboration first begun in 2010. This is the first agreement of its kind outside of New England for Massachusetts General Hospital, the largest teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School.


“Our relationship with the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center has been very successful as we collaborate on new ways to provide leading-edge oncology care to our mutual patients,” said Dr. Patrick A. Taylor, president and CEO of Holy Cross Hospital.  “This agreement brings additional access to advanced care for cancer patients living in South Florida as well as a continuity of care for their patients as they travel to our community.”


Patients treated at the Michael and Dianne Bienes Comprehensive Cancer Center at Holy Cross Hospital will have access to an increased number of clinical trials and medical treatments. Genetic counseling services will be expanded and offered to all patients with a wide variety of cancer types to allow for the most personalized cancer medicine to be utilized.


Patients will also have access to the specialists at Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center and will receive timely referrals for second opinions and improved coordination of care. Physicians will be able to utilize an expanded rapid access process for patients needing to be seen either in Fort Lauderdale or Boston for their services.


“We are thrilled with the enhanced relationship we have now with Holy Cross Hospital in Fort Lauderdale,” said Dr. David P. Ryan, Clinical Director  of Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center and Chief of Hematology Oncology at Mass General. “This is our first integrated collaboration outside the New England area and we could not have chosen a better partner for this new way of providing the world’s best oncology care to our mutual patients.”

Physicians in both organizations will participate in weekly multidisciplinary patient case presentations as well as regular quality improvement reviews and patients may choose to have their medical records shared between specialists at the two hospitals.  Under the agreement, physicians practicing in the Holy Cross Hospital Michael and Dianne Bienes Comprehensive Cancer Center will become non-clinical consultant members of the Massachusetts General Hospital medical staff.


About Holy Cross Hospital
A member of Trinity Health, Holy Cross Hospital in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. is a full-service, non-profit Catholic hospital. Since opening its doors in 1955, the 557-bed hospital has offered progressive services and programs to meet the evolving healthcare needs of Broward County. Today, Holy Cross has more than 600 physicians on staff representing more than 40 specialties and more than 3,000 employees. To learn more about Holy Cross Hospital, visit holy-cross.com, “like” Holy Cross Hospital, Fort Lauderdale on Facebook at www.facebook.com/holycrossfl, or follow @holycrossfl on Twitter.


About the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center
An integral part of one of the world’s most distinguished academic medical centers, the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center is among the leading cancer care providers in the United States.

U.S. News & World Report consistently ranks the Mass General Cancer Center as one of the top ten cancer centers in the country. Its nurses were the first in Massachusetts to achieve Magnet status from the American Nurses Credentialing Center in recognition of the hospital's exceptional nursing care.


Known for providing customized, innovative treatments and compassionate care to both adults and children, the Cancer Center comprises more than 25 fully integrated, multidisciplinary clinical programs and a vast array of support and educational services. Its network of affiliations extends throughout New England and the southeastern U.S.

The Cancer Center’s commitment to eradicating cancer is fueled by scientific investigation conducted as part of one of the largest hospital-based research programs in the nation. Through a powerful synergy between laboratory scientists and bedside physicians, the Mass General Cancer Center fosters innovation in all phases of cancer research. Physician investigators conduct nearly 400 clinical trials annually.


The Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center is proud to be a founding member of a Harvard Medical School consortium designated by the National Cancer Institute as a comprehensive cancer center. This prestigious seven-member center forms the largest cancer research collaboration in the country. The promising new treatments developed through this partnership are revolutionizing the future of cancer medicine.


 


A few words from our patients

  • Posted Dec 02, 2014
  • hchadmin

Below is a fun picture of part of the Infusion Therapy Team...they are such good sports and great nurses, we did not want to close out the year without posting this photo!


...And here are some kind words from our Radiation Oncology patients that help illustrate that "Our mission is you."

Thank you for everyone who treated me with such kindness and care.
I've always hated hospitals until the day I stepped foot in Holy Cross. I can't say enough about the service and timely fashion for everything.
I think the Cancer Center is well run and I have received the best possible treatment.
I would like to say for a somewhat bad situation, Ari and Camille always made me leave there with a good feeling for the day. They are one in a million.
Dr. Goyal, Camille, Bonnie and Sean. Continue doing your incredible work.
Dr. Grosman and all of the staff...everyone was wonderful.


 

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Do you or someone you know have metastatic or locally advanced breast cancer?

  • Posted Nov 25, 2014
  • hchadmin

Find out if you qualify


Breast cancer is diagnosed in more than 1.3 million women worldwide each year and is the leading cause of cancer-related death in women. It is estimated that at least 5 percent of breast cancer cases result from inherited mutations or alterations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Women with these mutations have a lifetime risk of developing breast cancer of 40-85 percent. Males with BRCA2 mutations also carry an increased risk of breast cancer. The Brocade 3 study is a research study for men and women with HER-2 negative metastatic or locally advanced BRCA-associated breast cancer.

This research study is currently seeking female and male volunteers, ages 18 and older, who have been diagnosed with HER-2 negative metastatic or locally advanced BRCA-associated breast cancer. The purpose of this research study is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of an investigational drug, veliparib (or placebo), in combination with two chemotherapeutic drugs that are commonly used for the treatment of breast cancer.

Compensation for travel may be provided. More information on this study can be found by visiting www.Brocade3Study.com to see if you may qualify.


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Below is a commentary from Maureen G. Mann, MS, MBA, FACHE, Executive Director of the Michael and Dianne Bienes Cancer Center at Holy Cross Hospital, urging lawmakers to oppose House Bill 169. 

"...I am a very involved volunteer with the American Cancer Society...so this particular bill causes me great concern. Please see the notes below and VOTE NO when this bill comes to the floor...


Oppose House Bill 169
Nicotine Products & Nicotine Dispensing Device

Background
Originally, the intent of HB 169 was to prohibit the sale of nicotine products and nicotine dispensing devices (e-cigarettes) to minors. However, added amendment language would strip local governments of their ability to regulate all tobacco products and e-cigarettes, overturn existing ordinances, and block future opportunities to protect kids in the retail environment. For example, many of the product placement ordinances we currently have in Florida go beyond the minimum standards set by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), requiring that ALL tobacco products are placed behind the counter at retail stores, not just cigarettes and smokeless tobacco. With the preemption language, the bill now does more harm than good in the fight to keep Florida’s children tobacco free.


Key Points
Many of the ordinances we currently have in Florida deal with product placement, requiring that all tobacco, not just cigarettes and smokeless tobacco, are placed behind the counter at retail stores. They are stronger than the minimum standards required by the FDA and are all meant to keep tobacco
products out of the hands of children.

In-store tobacco displays serve to increase product availability, visibility and brand awareness and stimulate trial and purchase of products.1 Product placement laws limit youth access to tobacco via illegal sales and shoplifting.
Proponents for preemption claim that we need a uniform state law that covers all businesses rather than a patchwork of local ordinances. The fact is retailers are used to complying with a variety of local laws, including zoning, traffic restrictions, health regulations and even alcohol sales. Tobacco regulations
are no different than other regulations that vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction.        
Local governments are more flexible and responsive than state government in effectively dealing with emerging problems and finding innovative solutions. Local governments are closer to the community and have been more effective than the state or federal government in addressing the problem of
tobacco use.

My Position
State laws should serve as a minimum standard for a policy objective while allowing communities to enact stronger ordinances to protect their youth and residents in the most appropriate manner. The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, American Lung Association, American Heart Association, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids and our partners ask that you oppose HB 169 and prevent the dismantlement of effective local tobacco ordinances around the state."


 


About the Center

The Michael & Dianne Bienes Comprehensive Cancer Center in Fort Lauderdale, Florida is the Cancer Care Leader in Broward County. Dedicated to providing patients with precise diagnosis, the latest and most advanced treatment and aftercare options, we offer a multidisciplinary approach to care, a compassionate and spiritual healing environment, and an affiliation with the National Cancer Institute. We are also working together with Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center to provide South Florida residents with rapid access to specialized cancer care and genetics counseling.

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